Damn Stoked

Dawn meditation in Jacksonville Beach

Kicking off the year with a new domain!!! Welcome to Ant.Cat 😀

So damn stoked for 2018! For our family, 2017 was all about new beginnings…

Despite all the sad news that 2017 brought into the world, the Catanese household had a super cool year.

  • We moved from Florida to Colorado
  • My wife graduated top 1% of her class and has the job of her dreams #SoProud!
  • I started a new gig at Cognizant Accelerator (f.k.a. QuickLeft) in Boulder
  • We both started working with the VR art collective DenVR
  • Spoke at conferences
  • Successfully transitioned the entrepreneur group #StartupJax to new leadership
  • Explored proper Europe for the first time in Portugal

We’re now ready to dig in….and we couldn’t be more stoked about it. Of course, we’re always willing to be wiggly if the world needs us to be.

Huge thank you to our families, Ben, Morgan, Lauren, Amy, Erin, Jordyn, Shawn, the Jacksons, Philip/Alexandra, Stu, Selina, Bob/Celeste, and all the amazing people in our lives that pushed us forward. Love you all!


Keeping up with the tradition of adding a music video to each post. This time though, we had a hand in creating it 😉

DenVR artist Ben Tyson’s remix of Geographer — Kites using Lyra:

This World Is A Great Wiggly Affair – V2.2017

This post is and always will be a work in progress...
and each version will have its own space.
- Version 1 - 2014
Alan Watts by Kristen Taylor Wright: http://wp.me/P1eLdD-2
Alan Watts by Kristen Taylor Wright: http://wp.me/P1eLdD-2

“This world is a great wiggly affair. The clouds are wiggling. The waters are wiggling. The clouds are wiggling, bouncing.

People- but people are always trying to straighten things out. You see we live in a rectangular box, all the time; everything is straightened out.

Wherever you look around in nature you find things often straightened out. They’re always trying to put things in boxes. Those boxes are classified. Words are made from some boxes.

But the real world is wiggly, if you can believe it.

Now when you have a wiggle like a cloud, how much wiggle is a wiggle? Well you have to draw the line somewhere, so people come to sorts of agreements about, ah, how much wiggle is a wiggle, that is to say a thing. One wiggle- always reduce one wiggle to a sub wiggles. Or see it as a subordinate wiggle of a bigger wiggle. But there’s no fixed rule about it.”

-Alan Watts


This quote has sat with me for some time. At first, I enjoyed it because of the fun rantiness of it. One long deep thought about the world around us, which I often have, but never share.

We are compelled to try and order everything in our life. Nature is opposing this at all times: always changing, moving forward… being wiggly.

A large part of my early career was in the accounting and home building space while going through college. Both of these industries are heavily reliant on well-thought-out processes to squeeze as many dollars as possible. I LOVED it. Nothing felt more amazing than getting your numbers to align, or for zero change-orders to come in. But there was something inherently wrong with the way I was working on a day to day basis. My thinking became automated.

Having a set process of what you do every day is lovely, but it typically doesn’t change to take in the nuances that day brings. The process typically doesn’t try to learn how it can serve the client better. It offers the user an escape to zone out, but while the user is zoned out the world has wiggled out of sync with the purpose of the process.

And that, to me, is how businesses are lost.

We can overcome this, not by less process but by building guiding frameworks that are broad enough to give us a path forward without detailing everything out. The framework helps point out what to watch for. You build something, check it against your framework, and move on.


Here’s how Jeff Bezos of Amazon puts it in his annual shareholder’s letter, posted April 12, 2017, when asked, “Jeff, what does Day 2 look like?”

As companies get larger and more complex, there’s a tendency to manage to proxies. This comes in many shapes and sizes, and it’s dangerous, subtle, and very Day 2.

A common example is process as proxy. Good process serves you so you can serve customers. But if you’re not watchful, the process can become the thing. This can happen very easily in large organizations. The process becomes the proxy for the result you want. You stop looking at outcomes and just make sure you’re doing the process right. Gulp.

It’s not that rare to hear a junior leader defend a bad outcome with something like, “Well, we followed the process.” A more experienced leader will use it as an opportunity to investigate and improve the process. The process is not the thing. It’s always worth asking, do we own the process or does the process own us?

What excites me is that some of the top companies in the world are letting go of control…and getting wiggly:

  • Amazon is taking over the world, not by setting the company in concrete, but by flowing with the tides.
  • Toyota dominated the car industry by marrying the traditional assembly line with the freedom of their workers to make changes however they saw fit.
  • Tesla has built some of the best cars in the world using “Flexible Automation”.

This is the perfect place to play Will Smith — Get Jiggy With It, but I have to play the song that introduced me to the original quote…

STRFKR — Florida

 

This World Is A Great Wiggly Affair – V1.2014

This post is and always will be a work in progress...
and each version will have its own space.
- Version 2 - 2017
Alan Watts by Kristen Taylor Wright: http://wp.me/P1eLdD-2
Alan Watts by Kristen Taylor Wright: http://wp.me/P1eLdD-2

“This world is a great wiggly affair. The clouds are wiggling. The waters are wiggling. The clouds are wiggling, bouncing.

People- but people are always trying to straighten things out. You see we live in a rectangular box, all the time; everything is straightened out.

Wherever you look around in nature you find things often straightened out. They’re always trying to put things in boxes. Those boxes are classified. Words are made from some boxes.

But the real world is wiggly, if you can believe it.

Now when you have a wiggle like a cloud, how much wiggle is a wiggle? Well you have to draw the line somewhere, so people come to sorts of agreements about, ah, how much wiggle is a wiggle, that is to say a thing. One wiggle- always reduce one wiggle to a sub wiggles. Or see it as a subordinate wiggle of a bigger wiggle. But there’s no fixed rule about it.”

-Alan Watts

This quote has sat with me for some time. At first, I enjoyed it because of the fun rantiness of it. One long deep thought about the world around us, which I often have, but never share.

As time has moved on I’ve begun to understand it more and more. We are always trying to straighten out nature. This is particularly true with the way we develop process and go about working every day. Having a set process of what you do every day is lovely, but it typically doesn’t change to take in the nuances that the day brings. The process typically doesn’t try to learn how it can serve the client better. It offers the user an escape to zone out, but while the user is zoned out the world has wiggled out of sync with the purpose of the process. And that to me is how businesses are lost.

We can overcome this, not by less process but by building guiding frameworks that are broad enough to give us a path forward without detailing everything out. It helps to point out what to watch for. You build something, check it against your framework, and move on.

I work with teams on innovation which sounds super tech, but most of the time it’s the opposite. Most of the time it’s following a set of principles that help us understand what we’re trying to solve. Not by adding tech or adding more process, but by getting in the groove of the wiggly. Which is my new mantra.

This is the perfect place to play Will Smith – Get Jiggy With It, but I have to play the song that introduced me to the original quote…

STRFKR – Florida